Author: voice_cd

Truths on comforting women in china during ww2 [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-5-2 07:45:13 |Display all floors
There's a really good book out there--fiction, but well-written--partially about this topic. It's "Song of the Exile" by Kiana Davenport.

"The devastating effect of WWII on two Hawaiian families pervades this haunting novel that spans three continents and decades. Davenport (Shark Dialogues) traces the stories of Sun-ja Uanoe Sung (Sunny), a Hawaiian/Korean student from an educated family, and Keo, a native jazz musician, who meet and fall in love in Honolulu in the mid-1930s. When Keo (sometimes known as Hula Man) gets a chance to travel with a jazz band, he leaves Sunny for New Orleans and Paris. His reputation as a genius hornblower blossoms as quickly as racist violence darkens Nazi-infested Europe. Sunny escapes her fractured family life in Honolulu and journeys to join Keo in the City of Light. She revolts against the Nazi brutality she finds there, worrying also about the fate of her clubfooted sister, Lili, who was cast out by their father before Sunny was born. Arriving in Shanghai to look for Lili, Sunny is kidnapped and held captive as a "P-girl," servicing Japanese soldiers. Sunny is selected by one officer for proprietary use; her harrowing plight and that of thousands of other women and girls (some prepubescent) are described in searingly graphic detail. After the war, these women (who've aged several decades for every year of captivity) are too traumatized and ashamed to aid the Allies' feeble attempts at prosecution. There seems to be no real recovery from this level of atrocity, and Keo's story cannot equal Sunny's in intensity. After the war, Keo continues to search for Sunny, mourning and playing music. While the novel's nonsequential structure feels disjointed early on, it gains focus and power as Sunny's story unfolds. In the political maneuvering for Hawaii's statehood in 1959, the two families, bearing their emotional and physical scars, find some form of healing. Davenport's prose can verge on the purple, especially when describing Keo's musical artistry, yet overall she tells a powerful tale of love and loss."

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Post time 2007-5-2 18:35:06 |Display all floors
Originally posted by sockmonkey at 2007-5-2 07:22
I think you were the one haranguing, whampy. And how I manage my feelings is none of your business (or obviously concern). Do you have any  constructive remarks you'd like to make about the issue o ...



Hmmm ... interesting exchange.  But I think what whampoa's meant to say was that you are a "machine"-gun ... the way you "gun down" your throttle.  Human feelings? Save it.



[ Last edited by immouse at 2007-5-2 06:43 PM ]

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Post time 2007-5-2 18:41:38 |Display all floors
Originally posted by sockmonkey at 2007-5-2 07:45
There's a really good book out there--fiction, but well-written--partially about this topic. It's "Song of the Exile" by Kiana Davenport.

"The devastating effect of WWII on two H ...


"Fiction, but well-written ...."

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Post time 2007-5-3 03:54:45 |Display all floors

#51 and 52

That's right, Mouse.

Well said ... and well-illustrated.



---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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Post time 2007-5-3 04:14:39 |Display all floors

#49

Originally posted by voice_cd at 2007-5-2 07:37
With the fall of Nanjing, the former capital of Republic of China ruled by Chiang Kai-shek, the Japanese invaders slaughtered innocent Chinese, including women, children and the elder, which was ca ...



That's right, SuperModerator .... the "hell" the poor women (many who were very young) had to live through their nightmares hours by the hours, minutes by the minutes, seconds by the seconds, beaten up and tortured in addition to all the humiliations and insults until all end in deaths or their bodies render them useless.




---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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Post time 2007-5-3 04:34:02 |Display all floors
Originally posted by hitfm1102 at 2007-5-2 00:51
you know
if you want a japanese person to apology to you heartly
the only thing you should to do is to beat against and win him in many respective field
especialy in tech and military.
Japan is a great country from which we should learn a lot .


Alas, my missing post ....

I admire all great people and countries, but won't call it a "great" country one which dared not be honest and face its own history and past.

It's true we want their apology to come from their heart - sincere and unequivocal - but this is only possible if their people are told the whole truth, not half-truth and not distortion.  I believe the Japanese people (common folks) are also human and would have felt ashamed (and many did after learning the truth).  But if they had not been told the truth, the complete truth, that makes them dangerous and the world too (gist of my missing post).



---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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Post time 2007-5-3 04:43:40 |Display all floors

Gist of my missing post #46 ...

Who is this "world" who thinks China should just move on ....?

What is so "special" about the Japanese that they should be treated and perceived differently from their war compatriot N. German?

There are faults in all of us, the Chinese has it and so do the Jews.

You mean, the Jews are angels and they deserve better?



---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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