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China's Wang wins gold in short track [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2006-2-16 16:20:57 |Display all floors
After all the drama of the past few days, this was almost a can't-miss for the Chinese, a powerhouse in Summer Olympics but who only won their first Winter gold in Salt Lake City four years ago.

Overwhelming favorite Wang Meng won China the first gold medal in Turin, holding off Bulgaria's Evgenia Radanova by the length of a skate in the women's 500-meter short track final Wednesday night.

"It was challenging," Wang said. "It was very close at the end."

She still has three races to go, and "I haven't turned off the power," she said.

The 20-year-old Wang is skating in her first Olympics and won all four World Cup races in the 500 this season.

For the Chinese, though, so much had gone wrong already that nothing could be taken for granted, especially in the thrills-and-spills sport of short track speedskating.

On Tuesday, Wang Manli was just as big a favorite in the women's long track 500 and she crumbled under the pressure, winning silver.

A day earlier, Zhang Dan crashed spectacularly in the final of the figure skating pair's competition, effectively ending any hope to earn gold with her partner, Zhang Hao.

Wang Meng however fulfilled all expectations of her nation, getting off the line first and holding the lead the rest of the way. The only time she crashed was during a victory lap when her skate got tangled in the Chinese flag and she tumbled to the ice.

Radanova made a desperate lunge for the finish, falling after she crossed and sliding into the padding. But it was only good enough for her second straight silver medal in the 500.

At the end of the race, Wang had no doubts that she had won, roaring in delight and speeding across to her coach for a hug and to pick up a huge Chinese flag which she took on a victory lap of the Palavela rink.

Radanova, the 2002 silver medallist and European champion, looked disappointed as she took the second step on the podium while Wang jumped up and down on the gold spot, giving the thumbs up and V for victory sign and kissing the Chinese flag on her top.

Canada's Anouk Leblanc-Boucher, seen as an outsider coming into the Olympics, crossed the line almost at the same time as China's Fu Tianyu and thought she had been pipped to the podium until Fu was disqualified for crossing.

Leblanc-Boucher looked as happy as if she had won the gold, hardly believing she was stepping up on to the Olympic podium having only ever won one World Cup medal in the 500 in 2004/05.

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Post time 2006-2-17 08:28:14 |Display all floors

Congratulations to Wang.

A red letter day for Wang and China in the winter Olympics. China has a total of 6 medals to date with more likely to come. It is not the actual medal tally per say but the spirit of competition and struggle as shown by all Chinese athletes which has made us proud. We have meagre budget and facilities and we are just new comers to this winter games. For China to have climbed the ladder of success so quickly and efficiently is good for the game. There are still the detractors out there who would wish us ill. Let us show them our true colours ; competitive but fair and sporting. Congratulations to the whole Chinese team with the officials and coaches. You do not know how much pride you have imparted to us watching from the sideline all over the world; including the overseas Chinese. We are very proud of our ' jian er ".:)

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Post time 2006-2-17 08:46:02 |Display all floors

congratulations

australia also won our first gold medal
how many do you think our countries will win all up?
Everlasting...Creative...Inspirational

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Post time 2006-2-17 14:18:28 |Display all floors

Canadian doesn't count.

We in China do not need to count " borrowed " Chinese given swifty citizenship. Canadian Aussie who can't even mouth the national anthem do not count. China has already got 6 ( 1 G, 2 S ,3 B ) to date. Let us compare at the end of the games.

[ Last edited by mengzhi at 2006-2-17 02:25 PM ]

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Post time 2006-2-20 02:31:14 |Display all floors

Yes, do compare the final medal table

Originally posted by mengzhi at 17-2-2006 06:18
China has already got 6 ( 1 G, 2 S ,3 B ) to date. Let us compare at the end of the games.


And when you do so, remember to work that out as a per capita calculation

Congratulations to Wang and the other athletes. Though I was sorry to see another Chinese skater fall today in the 1000m time trials.

[ Last edited by mencius at 2006-2-19 06:32 PM ]
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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Post time 2006-2-20 04:32:02 |Display all floors

Jealousy unbecoming.

Originally posted by mencius at 2006-2-20 02:31
And when you do so, remember to work that out as a per capita calculation
Congratulations to Wang and the other athletes. Though I was sorry to see another Chinese skater fall today in th ...


mencius, thank you for your  fulsome congratulations, but your heart is in the right place, I think. So the old hoary chestnut of " per capita " has resurfaced ! Glad you have brought it up.

" per capita " is a very valid measure ( if sporting prowess can be measured ) especially for the vanquished. It is the pinnacle of jealousy, envy and frustration. If you mean by " per capita " the number of population divided by medals won, then you may have a simplistic and silly chance to snigger and smirk. China will have to win one fifth of ALL medals in order to stay " average ". This is obviously ridiculous and fanciful. What we can do ( I don't know why we should ) is to divide the dollars spent in preparation of a sport ; stadia construction, budgets for the institutes, coaches and facilities, money to travel constantly overseas for competition and the standard of living  which allows youngsters to participate, by the medal tally. Would you mencius care to enlighten us as to how the UK stand on this " per capita " calculations ? Any of the rich and idle countries would have a sports budget several times to hundreds of times that of China's. Any of them would have more athletes ( winter sports this time ) than China. Even good old Norway of Denmark would have more skiers and ice skaters than China. You take over from here and show us the arithmatic to your " per capita " taunt then. Capable of doing it ?or are you going to hide behind another slogan of slander . BTW what has the UK athletes done in Turin which deserve congratulations ? Heard they are good at curling ! All the very best.
:)

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Post time 2006-2-20 04:54:20 |Display all floors

Sour grapes

Originally posted by mengzhi at 19-2-2006 20:32

" per capita " is a very valid measure ( if sporting prowess can be measured ) especially for the vanquished. It is the pinnacle of jealousy, envy and frustration. If you mean by " per capita " the number of population divided by medals won, then you may have a simplistic and silly chance to snigger and smirk. China will have to win one fifth of ALL medals in order to stay " average ".


meng, you really do take things too seriously. I was just having a bit of fun. In any case it's your own fault for making snide remarks about Australia's gold medal. You said "the spirit of competition" was the important thing for these games. Then why were you deriding another country's achievements? Just because you feel justified doesn't mean that it isn't a petty comment to make. If the sport's regulations are adhered to then that is good enough for me.

Obviously medals are never going to be awarded in direct proportion to the size of a nation's population. But at the same time it's a bit daft for countries with a large population to laud it over much smaller ones for not doing as well. Sporting achievements always have to be put into perspective.

And given that sport is supposed to be about fun, surely it doesn't matter who wins what but how they are won. If China won 1/5 or more of all medals I really wouldn't mind, so long as the athletes were really the best. At Athens I really cheered for Guo Jingjing because she was magnificent - her nationality wasn't an issue for me. I doubt very much that if she'd been born in Korea, Singapore, or anywhere else you'd have just stood by while some non-Chinese made a comment about that.

BTW what has the UK athletes done in Turin which deserve congratulations


When it comes to the winter Olympics we never actually do very well. There's the slight problem in that we don't have much snow or ice :)

However one lovely lady, Shelley Rudman, got a silver medal in the women's skelton - my new "most dangerous sport". And the men's curlers are into the semis, so they have a chance to add to that. If we come away from a W.O. with any medals it's good. We do tend to clean up on unfrozen water though

[ Last edited by mencius at 2006-2-19 09:37 PM ]
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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