Author: ruotong

How do i love thee! [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-12-7 23:52:41 |Display all floors

Thank you, Dear Mirthful!

It must be a nice song. first time for me to see the usage of 'journey'  goes like this--- journeying. how nice it is that a heart can go a journeying!
thanks again and good night:)

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Post time 2005-12-9 08:43:32 |Display all floors

Love a la Gilbert&Sullivan 1-- Ruddigore

DUET:   ROBIN AND ROSE

ROB.              I know a youth who loves a little maid  
                (Hey, but his face is a sight for to see!)
        Silent is he, for he's modest and afraid  
                (Hey, but he's timid as a youth can be!)
ROSE.             I know a maid who loves a gallant youth,
                               (Hey, but she sickens as the days go by!)
                  She cannot tell him all the sad, sad truth  
                               (Hey, but I think that little maid will die!)

ROB.                                        Poor little man!
ROSE.                                       Poor little maid!
ROB.                                        Poor little man!
ROSE.                                       Poor little maid!

BOTH.             Now tell me pray, and tell me true,
                  What in the world should the young man/maiden do?

ROB.              He cannot eat and he cannot sleep  
                               (Hey, but his face is a sight for to see!)
                  Daily he goes for to wail, for to weep  
                               (Hey, but he's wretched as a youth can be!)
ROSE.             She's very thin and she's very pale  
                               (Hey, but she sickens as the days go by!)
                  Daily she goes for to weep, for to wail  
                               (Hey, but I think that little maid will die!)

ROB.                                        Poor little maid!
ROSE.                                       Poor little man!
ROB.                                        Poor little maid!
ROSE.                                       Poor little man!

BOTH.             Now tell me pray, and tell me true,
                  What in the world should the young man/maiden do?

ROSE.             If I were the youth I should offer her my name  
                               (Hey, but her face is a sight for to see!)
ROB.              If were the maid I should fan his honest flame  
                               (Hey, but he's bashful as a youth can be!)
ROSE.             If I were the youth I should speak to her to-day  
                               (Hey, but she sickens as the days go by!)
ROB.              If I were the maid I should meet the lad half way  
                               (For I really do believe that timid youth will die!)

ROSE.                             Poor little man!
ROB.                              Poor little maid!
ROSE.                             Poor little man!
ROB.                              Poor little maid!

BOTH.             I thank you, miss/sir, for your counsel true;
                       I'll tell that youth/maid what he/she ought to do!

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Post time 2005-12-9 08:46:38 |Display all floors

Love a la G&S 2-- Trial By Jury (1875)

When first my old, old love I knew,
    My bosom swell'd with joy;
My riches at her feet I threw,
    I was a lovesick boy!
No terms seem'd too extravagant,
    Upon her to employ--
I used to mope, and sigh, and pant,
    Just like a lovesick boy!

        Tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank,
        Tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank,

I used to mope, and sigh, and pant,
    Just like a lovesick boy!

But joy incessant palls the sense,
    And love, unchang'd, will cloy,
And she became a bore intense
    Unto her lovesick boy!
With fitful glimmer burned my flame,
    And I grew cold and coy;
At last, one morning, I became
    Another's lovesick boy.

        Tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank,
        Tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank, tink-a-tank,

At last, one morning, I became
    Another's lovesick boy!

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Post time 2005-12-15 13:19:02 |Display all floors

G&S Once Again (Yeoman of the Guard)

[]No. 19. A man who would woo a fair maid
                             (TRIO)
                   Elsie, Phoebe, and Fairfax

FAIRFAX             A man who would woo a fair maid,
               Should 'prentice himself to the trade;
                    And study all day,
                    In methodical way,
               How to flatter, cajole, and persuade.

               He should 'prentice himself at fourteen,
               And practise from morning to e'en;
                    And when he's of age,
                    If he will, I'll engage,
               He may capture the heart of a queen,
                    the heart of a queen!

ALL                 It is purely a matter of skill,
                    Which all may attain if they will.
                         But every Jack
                         He must study the knack
                    If he wants to make sure of his Jill!
                    If he wants to make sure of his Jill!

ELSIE               If he's made the best use of his time,
               His twig he'll so carefully lime
                    That every bird
                    Will come down at his word,
               Whatever its plumage and clime.

               He must learn that the thrill of a touch
               May mean little, or nothing, or much;
                    It's an instrument rare,
                    To be handled with care,
               And ought to be treated as such,
                    Ought to be treated as such.

ALL                 It is purely a matter of skill,
                    Which all may attain if they will:
                         But every Jack,
                         He must study the knack
                    If he wants to make sure of his Jill!
                    If he wants to make sure of his Jill!

PHOEBE              Then a glance may be timid or free;
               It will vary in mighty degree,
                    From an impudent stare
                    To a look of despair
               That no maid without pity can see!
               And a glance of despair is no guide--
               It may have its ridiculous side;
                    It may draw you a tear
                    Or a box on the ear;
               You can never be sure till you've tried!
                    Never be sure till you've tried!

ALL            It is purely a matter of skill,
               Which all may attain if they will:
                    But every Jack,
                    He must study the knack
               If he wants to make sure of his Jill,
               If he wants to make sure of his Jill!
                    But every Jack,
                    He must study the knack,
                    But every Jack,
                    Must study the knack
               If he wants to make sure of his Jill!
                    Yes, every Jack,
                    Must study the knack
               If he wants to make sure of his Jill!
when you speak of this -- and you will -- be kind

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Post time 2005-12-15 13:55:38 |Display all floors
I recently found a very nice website devoted to G&S(http://math.boisestate.edu/gas/). It even has MIDI files of the songs to give one a sense of the music; I hope all here find it enjoyable!
when you speak of this -- and you will -- be kind

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Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-12-16 16:10:34 |Display all floors

Many thanks, dear Mirthful

Thanks for your generous inputting of love songs and poems. they are really fresh and impressive. i appreciate them very much .
Thanks for introducing the link to us. it is accessible and very nice:)
Wish you happy weekend:):)

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Post time 2005-12-19 14:59:24 |Display all floors

A Prose Poem: Two Loves (From Real Life)

Sullivan Ballou's Letter to his Wife



July the 14th, 1861

Washington DC

My very dear Sarah:

      The indications are very strong that we shall move in a few days - perhaps tomorrow. Lest I should not be able to write you again, I feel impelled to write a few lines that may fall under your eye when I shall be no more.
      If it is necessary that I should fall on the battlefield for my country, I am ready. I have no misgivings about, or lack of confidence in, the cause in which I am engaged, and my courage does not halt or falter. I know how strongly American Civilization now depends upon the triumph of the Government, and how great a debt we owe to those who went before us through the blood and suffering of the Revolution. And I am willing - perfectly willing - to lay down all my joys in this life, to help maintain this Government, and to pay that debt.
      But, my dear wife, when I know that with my own joys I lay down nearly all of yours, and replace them in this life with cares and sorrows - when, after having eaten for long years the bitter fruit of orphanage myself, I must offer it as their only sustenance to my dear little children - is it weak or dishonorable, while the banner of my purpose floats calmly and proudly in the breeze, that my unbounded love for you, my darling wife and children, should struggle in fierce, though useless, contest with my love of country?
      Sarah, my love for you is deathless, it seems to bind me to you with mighty cables that nothing but Omnipotence could break; and yet my love of Country comes over me like a strong wind and bears me irresistibly on with all these chains to the battlefield.
      The memories of the blissful moments I have spent with you come creeping over me, and I feel most grateful to God and to you that I have enjoyed them so long. And hard it is for me to give them up and burn to ashes the hopes of future years, when God willing, we might still have lived and loved together and seen our sons grow up to honorable manhood around us. I have, I know, but few and small claims upon Divine Providence, but something whispers to me  that I shall return to my loved ones unharmed. If I do not, my dear Sarah, never forget how much I love you, nor when my last breath escapes me on the battlefield, it will whisper your name.
      Forgive my many faults, and the many pains I have caused you. How thoughtless and foolish I have oftentimes been! How gladly would I wash out with my tears every little spot upon your happiness, and struggle with all the misfortune of this world, to shield you and my children from harm. But I cannot. I must watch you from the spirit land and hover near you, while you buffet the storms, and wait with sad patience till we meet to part no more.
      But, O Sarah! If the dead can come back to this earth and flit unseen around those they loved, I shall always be near you; in the brightest day and in the darkest night -- amidst your happiest scenes and gloomiest hours - always, always; and if there be a soft breeze upon your cheek, it shall be my breath; or the cool air fans your throbbing temple, it shall be my spirit passing by.
      Sarah, do not mourn me dead; think I am gone and wait for thee, for we shall meet again.

                                                                                  Sullivan

(One week later Sullivan Ballou was killed at the Battle of Bull Run.)    [http://www.civil-war.net/pages/sullivan_ballou.asp]
when you speak of this -- and you will -- be kind

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