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Is it advisable to divide elite shcools from other schools in elementary edu?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2017-2-7 20:24:37 |Display all floors

Data from authorities indicates that thehousing prices of school districts are still on the rise. The problem rises aseducational resources are unevenly distributed. Local government should takemeasures to correct the imbalance. Given the narrow outlook on politicalperformance, some local governments have used available educational resourcesto forge a number of so-called elite schools and left others poorly equipped inhardware or software or both.

If local government keep using a major partof the educational resources on a small group of schools. How can we build aharmonious society?


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Post time 2017-2-7 22:49:47 |Display all floors
I think they shouldn't divide, it will hurts the students from other schools.

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Post time 2017-2-9 07:15:31 |Display all floors
This post was edited by Gayle at 2017-2-9 07:15

There is a similar issue in the United States with unequal funding for schools.   But what is different is that no one would say this is intentional.  Schools in the USA are funded by local property taxes, which are based on the value of the houses people live in.  Rich people in wealthy neighborhoods have much more valuable houses, so therefore they pay more property tax and their schools have more money.  Poor people pay less property tax, or none if they own no property, therefore their schools are much poorer. In some poor areas of the United States, especially in the inner cities, schools are shockingly inadequate.  It is not even a matter of not getting software like another school. it is a matter of broken toilets and decades-old textbooks with pages missing.

The rich often send their children to private schools, which are intended to be elite schools, no one pretends differently.  But in spite of the very unequal funding of public schools, it is not supposed to be intentional.  It is just a problem no one wants to solve because the obvious solution is to average out and equalize the funding, but the rich fear that they would be losing, so they block such measures with their influence.

I am interested in the subject of education policy and would like to talk to Chinese people who are also interested in this subject, in order to make comparisons between our countries.

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Post time 2017-2-9 09:31:51 |Display all floors
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Post time 2017-2-9 09:33:12 |Display all floors
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Post time 2017-2-9 10:55:49 |Display all floors
Why peg education to property taxes when property prices fluctuate? If policies are applied that succeed in cooling property prices and thus revenue for school resources, would that mean the schools concerned will have to lower the maintenance of their resources?

As with healthcare, infrastructure and security, education is one of the basic pillars of state services and is actually an investment to develop citizens to be productive contributors to state and society. Therefore it is a paramount objective whose delivery should not have to be divisively debated.

That said, the following can be considered:

- nationalize school properties at prevailing market price; audit deal;
- set nationwide standards on educational resources;
- all parents whatever their means pay standard school fees;
- if they have means to buy more, they can send their children to better private schools which should also be periodically assessed and findings publicly reported.

The issue arising is of course disparity. This is a worldwide phenomenon; for instance, it produces people with strange hairdos and unshaven jaws. The problem with disparity is not meritocracy but making available more openings for personal progress. Which of course depends on factors like ability and character under education, market opportunities under economics, and luck under destiny. Because most people can understand and accept these factors, they can accept meritocracy.

But what they should also accept is : their situation is not static - whether for the newly-minted rich or the still-remaining poor. Selling the message that a situation is not static is the key to overcoming inherent and natural prejudices of zealousy when seeing others doing better than oneself.

The tendency is to blame others but never to blame oneself. The result is to embed the notion of disparity so that anger and recriminations become hurdles to the very process of progress of meritocracy that would have changed the situation for the better.  If the process doesn't work, millions would not have come up in such short time to binge conspicuous spending.

Which of course can be strategic for the future. But then again one should draw the line very carefully. And that calls for better education for all, an objective which itself is also dynamic since one can use private school standards to benchmark public school standards to prod the latter to upgrade over time, especially when the property tax cost to school budgets can be subsidized by the government under a nationalization program.  The government can later sell off the schools and make capital gains to recoup its upfront cost should privatization of education becomes a trend again.

Looking at the pack of 20 hi-rollers who spent sgd240,000 for one spring festival dinner, maybe education is more than paramount. But then again admittedly it could be a strategic marketing move. The Chinese mind works in mysterious ways.

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Post time 2017-2-9 14:44:29 |Display all floors
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