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Why are African migrants giving up on their China Dream?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:54:48 |Display all floors
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Residents of Little Africa in Guangzhou say a downturn in business and widespread racism are driving them away.
"I like everything here, except when Chinese people cover their noses and mouths with their hands when they pass by me," says Radhy (right), student from Tanzania who lives in the southern industrial hub of Guangzhou, the largest African community in Asia. "I want to rush home when they point at me, as if they were judging," / Caixin (Liang Yingfei)

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:55:59 |Display all floors
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"The prices of goods in Guangzhou have risen (in recent years)," said Bauline, a businesswoman from Nigeria. Guangzhou is losing its competitive edge because factories are being shifted to Southeast Asia amid rising labor costs, making it harder to cut deals on the factory floor / Caixin (Liang Yingfei)

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:56:42 |Display all floors
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"It is so hard to find a job in Guangzhou. I might just go back to my home country if I can't find one soon," said Vikan, a student from Ivory Coast. Forty percent of African migrants in China had a university education, and some held a PhD., according to a survey by Adams Bodomo, Professor at African Studies Department of the University of Vienna. But some say it's difficult to find work due to deep-rooted discrimination against migrants of color / Caixin (Liang Yingfei)

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:57:30 |Display all floors
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"I don't like it when Chinese people look at me as if looking at an animal, just because of my dark skin. My work visa is going to expire soon. I am moving back to my home country," said Shirley, a French national born in the Ivory Coast who worked as a French tutor / Caixin (Liang Yingfei)

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:58:14 |Display all floors
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"I like the weather and people here. But I don't like the expressions of some Chinese people when they look at and talk to us. It upsets me," says Emma from Cameroon who works as the deputy manager of a Shenzhen-based company. A 2009 study by Sun Yat-Sen University found that three out of four white-collar workers and students in Guangzhou said they don't want to associate with African migrants although they have had limited interaction with them. The same study said only 12 percent of merchants and businessmen surveyed, who frequently communicated with African clients had a similar attitude / Caixin (Liang Yingfei)

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Post time 2016-8-24 13:59:26 |Display all floors
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Serges de la Roche, a businessman from Togo, says he was once mistakenly detained for five days, when he wasn't able to produce his passport during a police raid to catch illegal immigrants. He says he had submitted it to the immigration office to renew his visa at the time. Some in the community say ongoing police crackdowns have unfairly targeted African traders / Caixin (Liang Yingfei) (Source: Caixin Online)

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Post time 2016-8-24 15:15:27 |Display all floors
This post was edited by code22 at 2016-8-24 15:18

Baloney.  You are mixing two very different entities -- racism and olfactory intolerance.

People can choose what they want to smell, and what not to smell.  It is a natural reaction that has nothing to do with racism, but has everything to do with olfactory (smell) intolerance because of the different kinds of food they consume, and it cannot be overemphasized that it has absolutely nothing to do with racism.

Even now I cover my nose when I'm sharing a jacuzzi bath with Englishmen -- they usually smell like spoiled milk.  Do you call that racism?

Guangzhou used to be the only place foreign merchants can congregate to do business with the nation, and it still serves some of that function in modern times.

Unlike the truly racist Japanese, the Chinese people heartily welcome African friends into their midst, but if they smell bad because of the food they eat, anyone has the right to cover their noses under such circumstances.

If you don't like how a Sichuan resident smells like because of the highly spicy food they consume, you have every right to cover your nose in their presence, and no one in his/her right mind will call you a racist.

Narrow-minded bigot is what you are.

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