Author: Mark8

Would Democracy in China Really Be that Bad?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2015-10-24 19:56:31 |Display all floors
USA politics is corrupt.

Do not go the same way as the corrupt Americans.


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Post time 2015-10-24 20:08:24 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2015-10-24 11:14
Really? I don't know any CHinese people who believe their innermost views are cared for by the P ...

USA politics is corrupt.

China must not go the same way as the corrupt Americans.

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Post time 2015-10-24 20:15:17 |Display all floors
Democracy has the advantage that everybody eligible is entitled to vote. But the result is typically that many, if not most, of those eligible to vote are not adequately represented. Those lacking in representation include voters who chose their representative as the lesser of the evils but still did not agree with a large proportion of the policies on offer. And, needless to say, it also includes those who profoundly disagreed with the majority of policies put forward by the winning candidate and voted for the opposing candidate.

This flawed process of representation is also aggravated by minor political parties being denied seats/votes in the house of representatives in proportion to the percentage of votes that they received. e.g. If a political party won 51% of the votes in every single electoral district then the remaining political parties would have a combined 49% of the votes. The result is that the political party with 51% would secure ALL the seats in government as there would be no dissenting voice. In reality such a situation never occurs but the prospect of proportional representation and coalition government where 2 or more political parties combine their voting power to take the government seat scares the living daylights out of governments because governments like to bully their bills through the process of law making rather than debate them and seek a ground of common consent.  In a worse case but not uncommon scenario you could have a political party getting 49% of the votes and two other political parties getting 30% and 18% respectively. Meanwhile 35% of the voters were too disillusioned to even vote. This demonstrates that it is possible that a minority of eligible voters can elect a government leaving a minority of those eligible to vote being unrepresented. Even if everybody voted then within 18 months of an election public support for the government has typically fallen to the extent that the government of the day have lost a significant level of the support that they had during the election.

The process of so called representation is further diluted in that elected members in any party are under orders to vote according to the wishes of their political leaders. This does not necessarily represent the manifesto that the political party represented and any representation of majority of the general public is purely coincidental.

When seeking election political parties tend to buy votes by supporting minority viewpoints at the expense of the majority. They do this because it commonly only requires a small number of votes to secure election since most people vote along party lines rather than individual policies that by themselves would never gain public support.

One further aspect of democracy is that the support for the political party winning an election dissolves as the government of the day goes back on their electoral promises or introduces new policy over which the electorate was not consulted.  

Once elected into government political parties are subjected to lobbying whereby groups of individuals, businesses and even foreign government legally seek to influence the law making process, often in return for favours being awarded to the politicians. It is a form of legalised corruption.

So I have come to the conclusion that democracy benefits the politicians in securing their role in government for about 4 to 5 years more than it does the members of the voting public or the smaller number of actual voters and on these grounds I wouldn't wish democracy on anybody but would suggest that they seek a more representative solution that benefits everybody.
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Post time 2015-10-24 20:17:30 |Display all floors
Mark8 Post time: 2015-10-22 14:40
In other democracies, this does not happen: they get things done.

More slowly and China's growth rates out surpassing Western democratic nations are a good advert for China's system of government.
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Post time 2015-10-24 20:25:02 |Display all floors
Mark8 Post time: 2015-10-22 16:12
So you advocate the world should go back to Monarchy.  Bring back King Henry, King Louie, Alexande ...

If you had one wise person taking decisions it would theoretically be an improvement if such a person was independent.
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Post time 2015-10-24 20:50:47 |Display all floors
Mark8 Post time: 2015-10-23 02:25
It's like being children for ever: you are the legal property of the monarchs.

In law you are certainly nobody's legal property and you are free to leave any time you want. But given that we are not educated to be politicians then it doesn't seem reasonable that we would do a better job than existing ones without appropriate training so in that sense we are children.
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Post time 2015-10-24 21:01:16 |Display all floors
Newtown Post time: 2015-10-23 08:14
Well it's never going to get to that but imagine the recent Hong Kong scenario multiplied around a t ...

It is not a one party system but a system of multiple political parties dominated by the strongest one.

Hong Kong was a good example of what could go wrong in a system of democracy where a minority viewpoint is frustrated and tries to force their policies on the government of the day. Being as the protestors apparently represented a minority opinion it would have been wrong for the HK government allow themselves to be bullied into submission.
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