Author: bex

Is it possible to prepare a whole weeks food at a time?? [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 7Rank: 7Rank: 7

Glod Medal 2015 Most Popular Member Medal of honor June's Best Writer 2012 2016 Most Popular Member

Post time 2015-4-10 20:45:55 |Display all floors
bex Post time: 2015-4-10 19:25
oooo how do you make your own salad sauce?

A Vinaigrette is about the simplest salad dressing, it's quite tart (bitey) to the taste but an excellent choice for green salads etc.

To make it,

3 measures of light vegetable oil, for example Canola or Sunflower oil, or a Light Olive oil.
1 measure of White Vinegar or you could use Chinese cooking wine (white).

You can add almost any herbs and spices, ones I use and recommend,
Garlic
Salt & Pepper
Chilli
Lemon
Fresh herbs such as thyme, rosemary or shallots. (chop them very fine), mint also works a treat.

You can also play around with things like Red cooking wine, balsamic vinegar etc.

If you're going to infuse garlic or chilli, take the oil, heat in a pan until warm but not boiling, add a chilli or a couple of cloves and leave it out with a cover on the pan until it's cold, remove the garlic or chilli and then add the oil to the other ingredients.

About 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard per 150ml of dressing helps with emulsification blending) of the ingredients. Keep in a fridge in an airtight jar or bottle.  Shake well before use.  
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 7Rank: 7Rank: 7

Glod Medal 2015 Most Popular Member Medal of honor June's Best Writer 2012 2016 Most Popular Member

Post time 2015-4-10 21:01:06 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2015-4-10 20:41
Oh?

I must check my olive oil again.

This is from Wikipedia.  I could probably dig up the original sources as this is fully cited... it's the tip of the nasty iceberg..

An article by Tom Mueller in the August 13, 2007 issue of The New Yorker states that major Italian shippers routinely adulterate olive oil and that only about 40% of olive oil sold as "extra virgin" actually meets the specification. In some cases, colza oil with added color and flavor has been labeled and sold as olive oil. This extensive fraud prompted the Italian government to mandate a new labeling law in 2007 for companies selling olive oil, under which every bottle of Italian olive oil would have to declare the farm and press on which it was produced, as well as display a precise breakdown of the oils used, for blended oils. In February 2008, however, EU officials took issue with the new law, stating that under EU rules such labeling should be voluntary rather than compulsory.[11] Under EU rules, olive oil may be sold as Italian even if it only contains a small amount of Italian oil.

In 1993, the FDA ordered a recall of Rubino U.S.A. Inc., (Cincinnati, Ohio) olive oils which were nothing more than canola oil.[12]

In 1997, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency began conducting tests on 100 oils that claimed to be 100% olive oil and in 1999 the CFIA concluded that 20 per cent of the oils were fake.[13] In 2013, "Figures released at the [IOC's] Workshop on Olive Oil Authentication, held in Madrid June 10–11, show that one in four olive oils sampled in Spain, and nearly one in three in Canada, failed recent official fraud tests."

In 2007, American supermarket chain ShopRite recalled certain olive oils after it was discovered that they were counterfeit.

In March 2008, 400 Italian police officers conducted "Operation Golden Oil," arresting 23 people and confiscating 85 farms after an investigation revealed a large-scale scheme to relabel oils from other Mediterranean nations as Italian.[15] In April 2008, another operation impounded seven olive oil plants and arrested 40 people in nine provinces of northern and southern Italy for adding chlorophyll to sunflower and soybean oil and selling it as extra virgin olive oil, both in Italy and abroad. 25,000 liters of the fake oil were seized and prevented from being exported.

On December 22, 2008, the Guardia Civil in La Rioja (Spain) warned about the possible sale of adulterated olive oil in the area. This warning came after 550 litres of oil was found in a large container labelled ‘Astispumante 1510’ in Rincón de Soto and after the theft of 1,750 litres of oil was reported in the area on December 18, 2008.

In the first week of March 2010, researchers at the University of California at Davis' Olive Center purchased three bottles each of 14 imported olive oils and five California oils at retail stores in three different regions of California (Sacramento County, San Francisco Bay Area, and Los Angeles County). All of the oils were labeled "extra-virgin olive oil." Samples were shipped to the Australian Oils Research Laboratory in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales and were analyzed by their laboratory (which is recognized by the IOC to provide chemical analysis of olive oil) and tested by their sensory panel (which is recognized by the IOC as qualified to perform olive oil sensory analysis). Duplicate testing was performed at the UC Davis olive oil research project laboratories. Sixty-nine percent of the imported olive oils and 10% of the California oils failed to meet the IOC/USDA taste standards for extra-virgin olive oil. Samples that failed had a median of up to 3.5 IOC-standardized sensory defects (such as rancid, fusty, and musty). The standard IOC/USDA chemical tests only identified 31% of the failed oils as defective, primarily by exceeding the IOC/USDA limit for ultraviolet absorbance of late oxidation products (K232 and K268); two more recently introduced German chemical tests (now incorporated into the Australian extra-virgin standard) were each more than twice as effective at detection of defective oils. A subsequent round of testing in 2011 found similar results.

On March 15, 2011, the Florence, Italy prosecutor’s office, working in conjunction with the forestry department, indicted two managers and an officer of Carapelli, one of the brands of the Spanish company Grupo SOS (which recently changed its name to Deoleo). The charges involved falsified documents and food fraud. Carapelli lawyer Neri Pinucci said the company was not worried about the charges and that “the case is based on an irregularity in the documents.”

Standards Australia has adopted a code of practice for the testing of olive oils; however, while allowing oils to be certified as being genuine extra-virgin, the code regarding labeling is voluntary. The Australian Olive Association (AOA) is campaigning to have the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission force supermarkets to adhere to the code. After testing by AOA in 2012, every imported brand of extra-virgin olive oil fell below the standard that would be required for AOA certification
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 7Rank: 7Rank: 7

Glod Medal 2015 Most Popular Member Medal of honor June's Best Writer 2012 2016 Most Popular Member

Post time 2015-4-10 21:01:36 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2015-4-10 20:41
Oh?

I must check my olive oil again.

This is from Wikipedia.  I could probably dig up the original sources as this is fully cited... it's the tip of the nasty iceberg..

An article by Tom Mueller in the August 13, 2007 issue of The New Yorker states that major Italian shippers routinely adulterate olive oil and that only about 40% of olive oil sold as "extra virgin" actually meets the specification. In some cases, colza oil with added color and flavor has been labeled and sold as olive oil. This extensive fraud prompted the Italian government to mandate a new labeling law in 2007 for companies selling olive oil, under which every bottle of Italian olive oil would have to declare the farm and press on which it was produced, as well as display a precise breakdown of the oils used, for blended oils. In February 2008, however, EU officials took issue with the new law, stating that under EU rules such labeling should be voluntary rather than compulsory.[11] Under EU rules, olive oil may be sold as Italian even if it only contains a small amount of Italian oil.

In 1993, the FDA ordered a recall of Rubino U.S.A. Inc., (Cincinnati, Ohio) olive oils which were nothing more than canola oil.[12]

In 1997, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency began conducting tests on 100 oils that claimed to be 100% olive oil and in 1999 the CFIA concluded that 20 per cent of the oils were fake.[13] In 2013, "Figures released at the [IOC's] Workshop on Olive Oil Authentication, held in Madrid June 10–11, show that one in four olive oils sampled in Spain, and nearly one in three in Canada, failed recent official fraud tests."

In 2007, American supermarket chain ShopRite recalled certain olive oils after it was discovered that they were counterfeit.

In March 2008, 400 Italian police officers conducted "Operation Golden Oil," arresting 23 people and confiscating 85 farms after an investigation revealed a large-scale scheme to relabel oils from other Mediterranean nations as Italian.[15] In April 2008, another operation impounded seven olive oil plants and arrested 40 people in nine provinces of northern and southern Italy for adding chlorophyll to sunflower and soybean oil and selling it as extra virgin olive oil, both in Italy and abroad. 25,000 liters of the fake oil were seized and prevented from being exported.

On December 22, 2008, the Guardia Civil in La Rioja (Spain) warned about the possible sale of adulterated olive oil in the area. This warning came after 550 litres of oil was found in a large container labelled ‘Astispumante 1510’ in Rincón de Soto and after the theft of 1,750 litres of oil was reported in the area on December 18, 2008.

In the first week of March 2010, researchers at the University of California at Davis' Olive Center purchased three bottles each of 14 imported olive oils and five California oils at retail stores in three different regions of California (Sacramento County, San Francisco Bay Area, and Los Angeles County). All of the oils were labeled "extra-virgin olive oil." Samples were shipped to the Australian Oils Research Laboratory in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales and were analyzed by their laboratory (which is recognized by the IOC to provide chemical analysis of olive oil) and tested by their sensory panel (which is recognized by the IOC as qualified to perform olive oil sensory analysis). Duplicate testing was performed at the UC Davis olive oil research project laboratories. Sixty-nine percent of the imported olive oils and 10% of the California oils failed to meet the IOC/USDA taste standards for extra-virgin olive oil. Samples that failed had a median of up to 3.5 IOC-standardized sensory defects (such as rancid, fusty, and musty). The standard IOC/USDA chemical tests only identified 31% of the failed oils as defective, primarily by exceeding the IOC/USDA limit for ultraviolet absorbance of late oxidation products (K232 and K268); two more recently introduced German chemical tests (now incorporated into the Australian extra-virgin standard) were each more than twice as effective at detection of defective oils. A subsequent round of testing in 2011 found similar results.

On March 15, 2011, the Florence, Italy prosecutor’s office, working in conjunction with the forestry department, indicted two managers and an officer of Carapelli, one of the brands of the Spanish company Grupo SOS (which recently changed its name to Deoleo). The charges involved falsified documents and food fraud. Carapelli lawyer Neri Pinucci said the company was not worried about the charges and that “the case is based on an irregularity in the documents.”

Standards Australia has adopted a code of practice for the testing of olive oils; however, while allowing oils to be certified as being genuine extra-virgin, the code regarding labeling is voluntary. The Australian Olive Association (AOA) is campaigning to have the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission force supermarkets to adhere to the code. After testing by AOA in 2012, every imported brand of extra-virgin olive oil fell below the standard that would be required for AOA certification
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Post time 2015-4-10 21:46:29 |Display all floors
bex Post time: 2015-4-10 06:42
how

1.Pasta with Yogurth  2.Pasta with can of tuna and herbs
Round Up is good for developing the mind

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Post time 2015-4-10 21:48:14 |Display all floors
seneca Post time: 2015-4-9 12:53
Plus cook something DIFFERENT every day!

of course with few ingreadiants. if you dont want to make a 3 star michelin dinner
Round Up is good for developing the mind

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2015-4-10 21:59:42 |Display all floors
Ratfink Post time: 2015-4-10 20:30
Yes I live in a house, with gardens and a reasonably large vegetable patch and herb garden, fruit t ...

ha! envy you ! to buy a villa like that in China its like at least 10,000,000rmb , 4 layers with garden and stuff... what business do you own to make you so damn rich!!

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2015-4-10 22:00:23 |Display all floors
Ratfink Post time: 2015-4-10 20:36
Olive oil from Spain, most of it is adulterated and not what's advertised on the "tin" as it were. ...

how do you know? where do you buy your food from in China? metro?

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.